Anti-stall system was activated before Boeing 737 crash

Mar 30, 2019, 01:03
Anti-stall system was activated before Boeing 737 crash

In a briefing with reporters on Wednesday, Boeing said the highly anticipated changes would most importantly prompt the aircraft to utilize two sensors instead of just one to engage the MCAS, or Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, created to compensate for larger engines placed further forward on the wings of the MAX model, a new generation of the Boeing 737.

The automated system - known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS - is suspected to have played a role in both the Ethiopian Airlines crash and last year's Lion Air crash, which killed 157 and 189 people, respectively.

It is the second related piece of evidence to emerge from the black boxes of Ethiopian flight 302 after an initial sample of data recovered by investigators in Paris 11 days ago suggested similar "angle of attack" readings to the first crash.

The cockpit of Jet Airways Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircarft
REUTERS Abhirup Roy Probe into Ethiopian Boeing 737 MAX Crash Shows Anti Stall System Was Active- Reports

Reuters reported on Friday that USA and European regulators knew at least two years before the Indonesian crash that the usual method for controlling the 737 MAX's nose angle might not work in conditions similar to those in the two recent disasters, citing a document. Boeing declined to comment on the lawsuit.

It appears that U.S. and European regulators were aware at least two years before the first 737 Max crash that the method for controlling the plane's nose angle might not work in certain conditions.

The pilot tried repeatedly to regain control and pull the nose up, but the plane crashed into the ocean.

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The 737 MAX planes have since the accident been grounded worldwide.

In another development, Reuters reported Friday that United States and European regulators knew at least two years before the Indonesian disaster that the usual method for controlling the MAX's nose angle might not work in conditions similar to those in the two recent crashes.

However, the published flight manual did not reference these "unusual" situations, according to a copy from American Airlines seen by Reuters, with tragic consequences and an overall death toll of 346 lives.

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The US Department of Justice is investigating Boeing's development process and what Boeing disclosed about MCAS.

According to preliminary findings by Indonesian investigators, in the Lion Air disaster in October, pilots encountered nearly the exact set of "unusual" circumstances described in the EASA document. That may be why Boeing's shares ticked upward today in early trading.

Nine Brits were among the casualties when flight ET 302 came down 38 miles southeast of the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa.

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After the software update is approved, it would take about a day to deploy and an hour to upgrade each aircraft. Boeing's 737 Max 10 has not yet entered service and it's unclear whether it will also receive the updates.

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